By the lighthouse, waiting

By the lighthouse, waiting

If you lose your way, you can find me

by the lighthouse, waiting.

If it’s dark and waves are rising, I’ll be

by the lighthouse, waiting. 

If you feel cold and lonely, find me

by the lighthouse, waiting.

In the UK, we have a general election coming up – to add to our woes with government over the last couple of years. I guess people might think it’s all about Brexit and on the surface, it surely is, but to some extent, I think most of us have got to a point of feeling ‘what will be, will be’ with regards to leaving the EU. We’re tired and jaded, we’re sad and insecure – the waves are absolutely rising.

Of course, to add to our joy is the fact that the majority of people are faced with a line-up that wouldn’t even prove inviting on ‘Britain’s Got Talent’. So this is not a party political blog (although I have done one or two of those in the past).

This is a blog about the lighthouse in our country, our NHS. The NHS is there whenever you need it, you don’t find out you have a terrible illness in this country and have to worry about paying for treatment, or getting a job with sufficient health insurance, it’s just provided to all of us, equally.

The Conservative Party have indicated in the past that they are willing to sell off chunks of our NHS provision to the United States – one of the countries with the worst track record of only providing healthcare to those who can pay and making those who can least afford it further sick with worry.

I don’t know what the manifestos of the political parties will be, but I’m urging you with all my heart, please vote for someone who promises to invest in our NHS and not sell it off to private contractors.

My nephew had pneumonia a few years ago. He is a healthy young man in his 20s and he had a chest infection that turned into pneumonia. He ended up in hospital for 4 nights and missed a couple of weeks of work while recuperating. He was on a 0 hours contract and so he lost his income for that time – maybe around £700.00, but there was no further charge for his medical treatment or hospital stay. In the US, that would have cost him £10,000.00 and, of course, his 0 hours contract wouldn’t offer health insurance in those circumstances. The government believes in squeezing our young people from both sides.

2.5% of all hospital stays are due to pneumonia, something which is very easy to develop. Of course, the people who need the most care are the vulnerable – the elderly, the very young, those people who are already sick or have disabilities. Those people will be landed with the highest bills if our NHS is privatised and we have to pay for medical care in this country.

Ok, it might seem that I’m ranting, but really I’m pleading. I intend to go into this election with two goals – the first is saving our NHS from being sold off to capitalist knobs. The second is to vote for a party who most reflects my views on Brexit. My party allegiances are out of the window this time, for the good of us all. Please do the same!

If you’re not in the UK and you just read this diatribe… sorry. I’ll be back to kittens and sparkly things tomorrow ❤

What ARE you wearing?

Whimberly
!APHORISM!  – Sarah Dress & Coat Fatpack – Fameshed 1 – 27 November
!APHORISM!  Bella Wedge Sandals –  Blue
.BF. XO Necklace Silver (prev gift)
Izzie’s – Chevron Tights white (BOM)
tram G0210 hair

If you want to check out the full details for Aphorism’s Sarah Dress and Coat you can do so on Flickr. Rucy, the owner, doesn’t model his clothes, because mostly they don’t go with his beard and I heard he has knobbly knees. 😀 ❤

 

 

 

 

 

 

ReadMeri

I write a combination Second Life Fashion blog while rambling about my real life, tiny bits of fiction and reviews of SL items. It's a bit of a mish-mash, just like me! <3

36 comments

  • I recall the story of Charlie Gard and was heartbroken when I read how little power the parents had when it came to seeking treatment for their own child. I don’t want any bureaucrat having that type of power of me. I know it’s more complicated than that, but in my experience, everytime government tries to help, they just screw it up more. And it’s good to rant! I enjoy reading all sides of my favorite bloggers.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Quite honestly the Charlie Gard situation was a media mess. They were talking about transporting a baby who was on life support to the USA, for an experimental treatment that, once the American consultant had seen him, said wouldn’t have worked. I understand that everybody wants what’s best for their child but little Charlie would never have lived and, if he’d been kept on life support, would have remained totally unresponsive.The British health system doesn’t preclude the use of private healthcare, I’ve had it myself when I had to, but prolonging the suffering of a baby was something the NHS wasn’t willing to go along with. And while it was hard to see, most people agreed with the courts.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I think that your penultimate sentence (I’ve wanted to use that word in a sentence forever!) is what I worry about for public health. I don’t want any court making choices for me. I feel that the choice should have been with the parents, not the government.

      Liked by 1 person

    • I agree for the most part, but that’s not how it is on a usual basis. Most children can and do whatever their parents wish when it comes to medical care, using the NHS or private healthcare, at home or abroad as they wish. The NHS not only initially supported the experimental treatment for Charlie but had agreed to pay for the NY doctor to fly over and work on him. But then Charlie got much worse and the treatment had no chance of working, as the American consultant agreed. I think there comes a point when the healthcare professionals are not being listened to and to continue dragging the poor child through it becomes cruel. The poor parents though, it must have been hell. X

      Liked by 1 person

    • I think the final decision power that the government has is what concerns many people here in the US. It was further impacted when we were told that we could keep our doctors if we liked our doctors under the ACA. That wasn’t true for a lot of people here. I guess I’m a skeptic of large government powers. Maybe I read too much Orwell growing up.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Any Orwell at all is enough to make one fear the powers of mass authority, I agree. But it wasn’t government who stepped in, it was Great Ormond Street Hospital which is the best children’s hospital in this country and one of the five best in the world. I do take your point though… truly. What is the ACA?

      Liked by 1 person

    • Ok… and that said you could keep your doctor if you wanted? (I’ve obviously missed a whole load of memos, haha). That’s a good thing isn’t it?

      Liked by 1 person

    • The US healthcare system seems very complicated from here (although I’m guessing the same is true in reverse). Here you get a doctor given to you, almost at random, but you can see who you like. You register at a specific surgery – like near your home – and then just choose who you want to see when you need an appointment. It’s good cus like my old mum can go see her own doctor (who’s a guy and very efficient) when she wants something suitable or go see a woman if she has any more personal issues.

      I’d love to know more about how your system works if you have the patience to explain?

      Like

    • With my plan, I select a doctor of my choice, which for me is one closest to where I work. I have an annual checkup/physical and there is no cost associated with that, since it’s preventative care. If I have something that is beyond the scope of my primary care physician, I’m referred to a specialist. I’ll be given a selection of 3 or 4 in network doctors, although I can go out of network, too. It’s really simple, and it’s efficient, too.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, so it does rely on your own funds if your employer doesn’t cover it. That must be hard for people who don’t have the money to cover a plan.

      Like

    • There’s medicaid and CHIP for low or no income people. The reality is that 8.5% of US citizens don’t have health insurance. A part of that percentage is from people who are young and choose not to buy it. I just feel that a huge government entitlement program that is based on 8.5% of the population, and threatens to disenfranchise 91.5% of the population by way of removing choices, is ill advised. Find a way of covering those who can’t afford insurance, but leave the rest of us alone.

      Liked by 1 person

    • It seems silly to mess people about who are already happy with the provision they have and the removal of choice is never good. Here, even if you have private health insurance (which is sometimes given as an employment ‘perk’ but by no means often) you go to see your General Practitioner (who is employed by the NHS) and they refer you to either your private health insurance provider for a private consultant or you can choose who you want to see through the NHS. Most private consultants also do NHS work, so you really can choose to see anyone, except with the NHS, your waiting time to be seen might be longer than if you have private insurance.

      I’ve had both (private and NHS consultants) and while the private care was faster and more luxurious in terms of accommodation, the NHS consultant was better, in fact he was the world-leading expert on the niche condition I went to see him about. I was impressed!

      Now I’m self-employed and without private medical insurance, I’m even more keen on keeping our established NHS system in ‘good health’ 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • “I’m a skeptic of large government powers.”
      Yes, right but it wasn’t the gov’mt making the decision but a court of law. And anyway, all that hate on large gov’mt powers is mostly only valid in and for the USA, since in most European countries we’re still believing and are able to become part of gov’mt ourselves. We don’t need millions to finance election campaigns, I guess it’s even illegal inn most EU countries. I guess in Germany your party gets a certain amount of money to finance the ad campaigns and they are only allowed for a certain period before any election. Couple weeks at most. And you, aas a candidate don’t need to be rich neither. Be a long-time party soldier, work hard on your career and you float up and become eligible. Troglodytes like Trump wouldn’t simply be possible in Europe. When not even the majority of your own party stands behind you, they will never nominate you and send you into the race.
      But anyway, itv wasn’t some politician with delusions of grandeur who ended the kid’s life. Social health insurance, same as the UK’s NHS operate outside of gov’mt.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Isn’t the judiciary part of the government? It is here. As far as the EU, at least in the US, we don’t have some unelected beaurocrat in Brussels making laws for us. So, yeah, there are those broad government powers in play, but they just call them something different.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Orca is right regarding the UK judiciary system, it’s not a part of government. In fact recently, it was called upon to act against the elected Prime Minister and did so without too much undue fuss. It’s called Separation of Powers apparently.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, we have the same situation, the judiciary is a third, but separate branch of government. The judges are nominated by senators and then approved or denied by the Senate.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Fascinatingly, ours are appointed officially by the Queen, although on the advice of the Lord Chancellor who is a member of the Cabinet. Since 2005 there has been a greater separation of government and judiciary because of concerns politics and justice weren’t on the same page (well duh). I’m astounded I’m getting to discuss this stuff on my SL blog, lol, I used to be in lobbying and the workings of government is not something most people want to talk about often! 😀

      Liked by 1 person

    • Oh – and we do elect the European Parliament members for our country too. Not that we seem to have done too good a job of it!

      Like

    • “we don’t have some unelected beaurocrat in Brussels making laws for us.”
      Yeah, that’s a bummer with the European parliament, it’s a basically undemocratic institution. We’re goverened by a bunch of unelected commissaries who deal in dark backrooms. If Trump hadn’t decided against it we’d by now be living with that American dealio contract nobody ever seen before signing away our basic customer rights and protection and that would’ve brought us down to poor American levels of human rights.
      Pheeew, we got away this time.

      Like

    • He’s not my kind of author, although I always appreciate book recommendations. I find I have little in common with Etonian conservatives.

      Like

    • I’ll add no more to this topic other than to say it’s difficult to read about my country and it’s leader(s) when just about every country has its own faults. A bit of perspective. So, no malice intended to you or Orca.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Oh I totally agree, no system is perfect. And I do welcome discussion from every viewpoint. The world would be a boring place if we all thought the same thing. Have a fabulous weekend Rob x

      Liked by 1 person

    • “the left here on the US is trying to mimic the same suicidal path.”
      LOL, you don’t have a real left in the US. You just don’t! I mean a real political left, socialists,social democrats and the likes. You more or less only got 2 parties, and both of them are sooooo far far to the extreme right, you could almost call them fascist.
      And with suicidal path you mean the anti-democratic right-wing poltics of the EU parliament, who are slowly stealing our human rights and state services and delivering us to Washington’s will, or what? I’m just happy we don’t live anymore in that madhouse but in a truly free country.

      Like

  • I’m not i the UK and I just read this diatribe … and I’m sorry for how things work out on your side of the channel.
    Can’t say much about Brexit, only that I’m a very strong proponent of the EU. In theory. The way those fukkaz in Brussels ruin everything makes me think we all should exit that sad bureaucratic madhouse and you Brits are just the first ones to act. Typical England, always the trendsetters. 😉<
    But the NHS? It’s a holy cow is it not? An institution with a proud history that must NEVER EVER be sold or demolished!
    I’m Orca Flotta and I approve this message. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • YES! The Nhs is precious and must be protected. You’re right. I dunno about being trendsetters but I fear the UK leaving the EU will damage the rest of Europe and contribute to a decline of the union…. And as we’ve not lived life outside of it, I dunno how bad that will be yet. I just wish this farce had never started.

      Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, agreed, UK leaving will damage the union. Not as badly as it will hurt the UK but in the end we’ll all end up with more than just a black eye. 😦

      Liked by 1 person

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